Menu

Today’s Lowest Reverse Mortgage Interest Rates for the HECM Reverse Mortgage Loan. Lowest Rates equals More Money For You.

A little-known fact to most seniors is that the interest rate you can secure on your reverse mortgage loan is the most important factor in determining which banks offer to take.

Forget bank talk and fancy terminology; you want to pay attention to what the bank will charge you in interest to borrow the money (or to borrow the money to pay off any existing home loans or debt).

Our company sole mission is to help seniors compare these loan offers and ultimately find the lowest rate program. We have spent considerable time in creating a network of relationships with major HUD approved lenders who are all willing to give free quotes and compete for your business.

Who can apply for a reverse mortgage?
Be 62 or older. If one spouse is under 62, you may also apply.
Have sufficient equity available. Home equity is simply the difference between what the home is worth and subtracting any existing mortgages. The difference is the equity available. The more equity you have, the better off you are.
Must be your primary residence. Investment homes and or second homes do not qualify.

Don’t make the same mistake most seniors make. Get educated on how the program works and how you can secure the lowest rate HECM reverse mortgage. If you prefer that we compare and analyze this information for you, no problem, we can shop around and put the best offer on your table from one of our licensed partners. You should receive anywhere between 2-3 different quotes, and we typically compare upwards of 3-5 lenders before letting you know or putting you in contact with the lender who has the lowest/best rates for your program.

What are today’s current reverse mortgage interest rates?
Below we show you current reverse mortgage rates both the Fixed-rate and adjustable-rate HECM programs. Please note that this is only a reference and not a loan offer.

Fixed-Rate  Adjustable 
Note Rate
4.00% 
2.154%
Monthly Insurance Rate 1.25% 1.25%
APR (Inc. insurance & closing costs) 5.72% **see below
Index
N/A
0.15
Margin N/A 2.00
Monthly Servicing Fee
$0
$0
Lending Limit
$625,500
$625,500
Payment Plans
Lump Sum Yes Yes
Line of Credit No Yes
Monthly Payments for Life No Yes
Combination No Yes

How are the interest rates calculated for my loan? LIBOR, which stands for London Interbank Offered Rate, is the index of which all banks peg their reverse loans off of. There is a markup above the LIBOR so the bank can make money; different banks will charge different rates. LIBOR rates are lower than the old indexed used CMT (constant maturity of U.S. treasuries). That is great news for seniors.

How can I secure the lowest reverse mortgage rate? Easy, comparison shop. As mentioned above this is what our company does, and we have invested significantly in making sure we can beat whatever deals you can obtain on your own.

Are reverse mortgage interest rates higher than traditional mortgages? Yes, HECM rates are higher than most typical mortgages such as an HELOC, home equity loan, or a cash-out refinance. The main difference being that none of those programs allow you NOT to have a monthly mortgage payment to make. So, if you are looking at reducing payments or borrowing money without a payment, there is NO point in comparing those other programs as they are not related.

What is mortgage insurance premium and how does that work?
Every borrower who takes out a reverse mortgage will be responsible for paying an initial Mortgage Insurance Premium (MIP), as well as an annual MIP of 1.25 percent. For more information on other fees required visit our fees/costs of the HECM loan.

What factors make up the calculations to determine my reverse mortgage loan?

Great questions. There are many factors which influence how much you are able to borrow and at what costs (through fees and interest rates). Some of these factors are:

  • Age of the youngest borrower. Older the borrower the more equity is available.
  • Lending limits set by FHA/HUD and the lender if its a private program
  • A value of your home determines by the appraisal (and not Zillow.com or any other website).
  • PFL – principal factor limits
  • The interest rate on the HECM loan.
  • If you have any existing mortgages or debt to payoff.

Use our free reverse mortgage calculator.

Related searches:

reverse mortgage rates
reverse mortgage rates and fees
a current reverse mortgage rates
compare reverse mortgage rates
best reverse mortgage rates
reverse mortgage interest rates
reverse mortgage interest rates and fees
current reverse mortgage interest rates
compare reverse mortgage interest rates
best reverse mortgage interest rates
HECM rates
HECM rates and fees
current HECM rates
compare HECM rates
best HECM rates
HECM interest rates
HECM interest rates and fees
current HECM interest rates
compare HECM interest rates
best HECM interest rates
http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/documents/huddoc?id=fharates_current.pdf

Reverse mortgage terminology related to interest rates

When researching and applying for a reverse mortgage, you will likely hear or read several industry and contract terms. Many of these terms deal with the various interest rates that apply to a reverse mortgage. Below are some of the more common terms related to reverse mortgage interest rates.

Actual Interest Rate

The actual interest rate is what you pay when the loan becomes due. It will be based on actual interest rate movements during the loan.

Credit line growth rate

This is the rate that the unused portion of an HECM line of credit grows. Once the initial line of credit is determined — based on the value of the home and the age of the borrower — it grows automatically at a similar variable rate. The growth rate is equal to the lender’s margin, plus the 1.25 percent mortgage insurance premium assessed on the loan plus subsequent values of one-month LIBOR rates.

So if the lender’s margin was 2 percent and the LIBOR index value was 1.5 percent, the lender would add the 1.25 percent MIP to create a credit line growth rate of 4.75 percent (2% + 1.5% + 1.25%).

Expected Interest Rate

As its name implies, the expected interest rate is what the lender anticipates the loan rate averaging over the life of the reverse mortgage. It’s one of three factors, in addition to your age and the value of the home, that helps determine how much of your home’s equity you can borrow.

The lender will arrive at that rate based on the average yield for U.S. Treasury securities adjusted to a constant maturity of 10 years, or the 10-year rate on the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) Index. The expected rate is just a projection. The actual interest you pay when the loan becomes due will be based on actual interest rate movements during the loan.

Fixed interest rate

When a fixed interest rate is applied to a reverse mortgage, it means the rate will remain unchanged for the life of the loan, regardless of any movements in market rates or external indexes.

The main downside to a fixed interest rate is that reverse mortgage borrowers can only receive the proceeds in a lump sum. No other payment options are available with a fixed rate loan.

Als, reverse mortgage rules sate that borrowers can only claim 60 percent of the loan’s principal amount in the first year, unless they are using it to pay off the existing mortgage balance.

Lenders margin

The lenders margin is an amount added to market interest rates to determine the total variable loan rate for a given period. When establishing the interest rate of a variable rate loan, reverse mortgage lenders use an index, such as the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) Index or the U.S. Treasury Index. Lenders will then set a margin above the index percentage to determine the total variable loan rate. Once the lenders margin is set, it cannot change for the life of the loan.

For example, a lender may set its margin at 2 percent. If the LIBOR Index is 2.5 percent, the variable loan rate charged during that period will be 4.5 percent (2 + 2.5). If the LIBOR Index rises to 5 percent, the reverse mortgage interest rate will also rise, to 7 percent.

LIBOR

This is an acronym for the London Interbank Offered Rate, which reflects the rate at which banks borrow money from other banks. The LIBOR index is used on many variable rate reverse mortgages to help determine the rate assessed on the loan during a certain period.

The actual interest you pay when the loan becomes due will be based on actual interest rate movements during the loan.

Variable (or adjustable) interest rate

When a variable interest rate is applied to a reverse mortgage, it means the rate will fluctuate over the life of the loan. Each month or year, the interest rate will be recalculated based on external factors and the new rate will be applied to funds that you borrowed or accessed during that period.

For example, the interest rate on the first year of your loan may be 4.5 percent. The money you access during that first year will be charged 4.5 percent interest. The next year, the rate might increase to 5 percent and the funds you receive from the reverse mortgage during that second year will be charged 5 percent interest.

HECMs typically use the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) Index to determine variable loan rates. The U.S. Treasury Index is also commonly used. Reverse mortgage lenders will then set a margin above the index percentage to determine the variable loan rate. Once the margin is set, it cannot change for the life of the loan.